Expert Advice
At some stage, we all come to the realisation we are not getting any younger and must begin planning for...
Expert Advice
What happens to our Instagram, Facebook and Twitter accounts when we die? Many people may not be aware they have...
Accounting
On 1 January 2019, a new standard for lease accounting came into effect, affecting any organisations that lease buildings, offices,...
Canberra lessors, financiers and suppliers urged to check their PPSR registrations
Property
The Personal Properties Securities Act 2009 (PPSA) came into effect on 30 January 2012, providing regulation for personal property that is used as security, and clear reporting of security claims by creditors over particular goods and assets. As a result, the Personal Property Securities Register (PPSR) was established. The PPSR makes it easy for consumers to check if an item...
How can you subdivide your rural or farm land in NSW?
Property
Deciding to subdivide a parcel of land is the easy part, it's what follows that can be tricky, with many hoops to jump through, and costs and conditions to be met. Meyer Vandenberg's Property Commercial & Finance Team takes you through the process and answers the key questions. What is the purpose of subdivision? In NSW, any plan that creates new...
Scam, Bam, Time to Give a Damn?
Expert Advice
Scamming; we know it happens – but mainly to “others”; we dread it happening to us. But do you really appreciate how easily you can fall victim? With the advent of digital globalisation – particularly internet banking - stealing a person’s money has become relatively “easy”. Last year alone, according to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, there were 177,516...
What unimproved value means – and why you should care
Property
You’ve received your annual rates from the ACT Government but are puzzled by the ‘unimproved value’ figure. What does it mean exactly? How does the government calculate it? How often is it revised? Should you even care? "These are all good questions," says real estate agent Ryan Broadhurst, from Belle Property. "One thing is for sure, you should take note...
Estate assets: to sell or not to sell?
Accounting
You’re an executor and are thinking that the easiest and most efficient way to administer a deceased estate is to sell the assets and divide the proceeds among the beneficiaries. You’re also feeling a bit of pressure from the emotions and financial need of beneficiaries. But is selling the assets the way to go? Ellen Bradley, Senior Associate at Bradley...
Good fences make good neighbours
Property
It seems simple enough. You want to erect a fence to give you privacy and keep the kids and pets safe when they’re playing in the backyard. You pitch the idea of a common-boundary fence to your neighbour and immediately run into problems. Your neighbour doesn’t want one and they certainly don’t want to contribute to paying for one. What...
Enjoying a stress-free Christmas with children after separation or divorce
Family Law
On the surface, Christmas is one of the happiest, most magical times of the year – filled with love, laughter and memorable moments paved with green and gold. But the underbelly often takes on a different complexion, with many people admitting that Christmas makes them nervous and irritable as they struggle with budgeting and buying gifts, planning and cooking meals,...
Six tips for bidding without regret at a property auction
Property
Canberrans love a good auction, with many ACT home owners choosing auction over other sales methods to sell their properties. In addition to driving competition between potential buyers, an auction provides the opportunity to truly test what the market is willing to pay – rather than relying on assumptions of value. This can be particularly useful in a volatile market,...
Contracts: Black and White, not read all over
Business Law
If everything isn’t black and white, I say, “Why the hell not?” - John Wayne Can two people read the same sentence, but take away different meanings?  The answer to that question, depending on the people, is ‘Yes’.  But what is the legal consequence, and how can a contract be enforced, should that occur? That was the question asked of the...
Succession planning can avoid sudden crisis
Business Law
In 2007 a car accident took the life of a business partner of Mark Love and his colleagues. This was not only a tragedy but also potentially devastating for their business. The director of Bradley Allen Love business and corporation section, Mr Love said a shareholders' agreement was already in place as part of a succession plan. This plan, backed...
Women’s super, not so super – RSM tackles the gender gap
Accounting
Women who raise children and care for ailing members of their family are often left with the least amount of superannuation for their retirement. Across Australia, most women have on average about $157,000 in their superannuation fund when they retire. According to RSM Australia, this is woefully inadequate and well below the recommended amount of $545,000 required for a single...
Human Rights Commission reveals sexual harassment at work is increasing
Business Law
Last Wednesday, the Australian Human Rights Commission released the results of an extensive survey, showing that sexual harassment remains a prevalent issue in today's workplaces. The 2018 survey, which includes sexual harassment towards men and women, found that sexual harassment at work had increased significantly since previous surveys in 2003 and 2012. Speaking at the National Press Club, Sex Discrimination...
On the back of a napkin: when is a contract really enforceable?
Business Law
It’s a Friday night, and you and your best mate are sitting at the pub having a couple of drinks. He’s telling you about his new business and lamenting that if he only had the money for a great website to promote it, he could be making a fortune by years’ end. Knowing you’re a web developer, he asks you...
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